SIMPLICISSIMUS - A red bulldog stares menacingly through stone-cold white eyes

Founded in 1896 in Munich, Germany, Simplicissimus was one of the most biting, satirically critical magazines ever published. The red bulldog symbolized the Volk, or common people. The authorities used stern measures to muzzle the dog, but despite frequent censorship and periodic arrests, this illustrated tabloid rarely missed an appearance. The bulldog, designed by Thomas Theodore Heine (1867-1948) was arguabley inelegant. The poster lettering was crudely hand drawn, yet the poster was a totality. The lettering suggested immediacy and complimented the bulldog's tense, frozen stance.

- Stephen Heller & Karen Pomeroy from Design Literacy: Understanding Graphic Design (Images sourced online)

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